wildlife

Mountain Lion Sightings in Canyon

mountain-lion-portrait There have been several sightings of a young mountain lion in the area. Remember, if you encounter a mountain lion, do not run. Instead, face the animal, make lots of noise and try to look bigger by waving your arms and throw rocks or objects to scare it away. If attacked, fight back.

The Pasadena Humane Society has posted a Mountain Lion Awareness flier and the City of Glendale has created a wildlife sighting website where you can see and post sightings of different types of wildlife in the city. The site is relatively new so there are not many postings yet. You can read more about this website in this article by the Glendale News Press: http://articles.glendalenewspress.com/2013-06-06/news/tn-gnp-mountain-lion-spotted-in-glendale-neighborhoods-20130606_1_mountain-lion-rossmoyne-wildlife-sightings

The Legend of the Glenoaks Bear

Bear in treeThis story was sent to Joan Morris, GOCHA's President. We thought it would be a nice story for the website. Enjoy.

Years ago they say, a bear escaped the LA Zoo and found his way to a back yard in Glenoaks Canyon.  He survived on homegrown avocados.  The mystery continued when they say he was chased to the hills by the local wildlife: coyotes, skunks, and possums, never to be seen again.  It is also rumored that the "Glendale Bear" may have been adopted by a local canyon family, and lived his life out with them disguised as a 20-lb poodle.  The neighbors memories are "fuzzy"...but remember the said growling poodle participated in the annual BOW WOW POW WOW and enjoyed free pancakes at the homeowners breakfast.  It was also suspected that the "Glenoaks Bear" appeared as himself at the Halloween Block Party this past year!  Some say they recall the poodle enjoying walks in the canyon with his owner, who always wore a black baseball cap.    Fact or fiction?? —-- what really happened no on knows for sure; but the legend continues......

Know of any more canyon stories. Send them in and we'll put them on the website. Send your stories to mitchellr@glenoakscanyon.org.

Mountain Lion Sighting

This week, a mountain lion was spotted in our canyon. A canyon resident reported seeing a mountain lion on the ridge above Hollister Terrace near Elvina on Monday. If you have also seen the lion, please add your sighting to the comments of this post. As a reminder, here is some information regarding mountain lions pulled from the Glendale Police department.

Mountain lions are generally described as tawny colored with black-tipped ears and tail. Adult males may be 8 feet long from nose to end of tail and generally weigh between 130 and 150 pounds. Adult females can be 7 feet long and weigh between 65 and 90 pounds.

If You Encounter a Mountain Lion: •    Do not hike or bike alone (go in groups, with adults supervising children) •    Keep children close (keep children within your sight at all times) •    Do not approach a lion, they want to avoid a confrontation •    Do not run from a lion (make eye contact, pick up children without bending down) •    Do not crouch down or bend over •    Do all you can to appear larger (raise your arms, open your jacket, wave arms slowly, talk loudly) •    Fight back if attacked (throw rocks, use sticks, remain standing)

For additional information, please contact the Glendale Park Rangers at (818) 334-9042. Also, keep your pets indoors at night if possible. Please keep me posted on any close encounters.

Mountain Lion Sighting

Mountain Lion Glendale officials announced today that a mountain lion was spotted February 15 in the Verdugo Mountains. The large lion was seen by officers in a Glendale Police Department helicopter while the animal was sunning itself in a clearing. Officials have not said specifically, where in the Verdugo mountains, the sighting took place. Mountain lions are a natural part of the region’s environment. They usually hunt alone, at night. Lions are very powerful and normally prey upon large animals such as deer. Generally, mountain lions are calm, quiet and elusive. An adult male’s home range can span over 100 square miles; an adult female has a range between 20 – 60 square miles.

In response to the sighting, Glendale officials will be posting signs and flyers at various locations including Deukmejian Wilderness Park and Brand Park.  Representatives of the State Fish and Game Department have also been notified.  Officials say this is the first mountain lion sighting this year.

Mountain lions are generally described as tawny colored with black-tipped ears and tail. Adult males may be 8 feet long from nose to end of tail and generally weigh between 130 and 150 pounds. Adult females can be 7 feet long and weigh between 65 and 90 pounds.

If You Encounter a Mountain Lion:

•    Do not hike or bike alone (go in groups, with adults supervising children)

•    Keep children close (keep children within your sight at all times)

•    Do not approach a lion, they want to avoid a confrontation

•    Do not run from a lion (make eye contact, pick up children without bending down)

•    Do not crouch down or bend over

•    Do all you can to appear larger (raise your arms, open your jacket, wave arms slowly, talk loudly)

•    Fight back if attacked (throw rocks, use sticks, remain standing)

For additional information, please contact the Glendale Park Rangers at (818) 334-9042.

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